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Ex-England manager Sven-Goran Eriksson diagnosed with cancer

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Former England manager, Sven-Goran Eriksson, has made a heart-wrenching revelation, disclosing that he is battling terminal cancer.

In an interview with a Swedish radio station, the 75-year-old football luminary shared, “Everyone understands that I have an illness that is not good. Everyone guesses it’s cancer and it is. But I have to fight as long as I can.”

Eriksson, who had been in robust health, recounted a sudden turn of events. Just a day before his hospitalization, he was engaged in a five-kilometer run.

However, he detailed how he “collapsed and fainted,” leading to the discovery of the cancer. Reflecting on the abruptness of the diagnosis, he noted, “It just came from nothing,” expressing a profound sense of shock.

Despite facing a prognosis of potentially having “at best a year to live,” Eriksson maintained a resilient outlook.

When asked about his condition, he remarked, “Maybe at best a year, at worst even less, or in the best case I suppose even longer. They can’t put a day on it.” He also clarified that, fortunately, he is not experiencing significant pain.

Describing the nature of his illness, Eriksson revealed, “I’ve been diagnosed with a disease that you can slow down but you cannot operate. So it is what it is.”

Advising on maintaining a positive mindset, he added, “It’s better not to think about it. You have to trick your brain. I could go around thinking about that all the time and sit at home and be miserable and think I’m unlucky and so on.”

Eriksson’s illustrious managerial career, spanning from 2001 to 2006, saw him coach the so-called “golden generation” of English footballers, including luminaries like David Beckham, Steven Gerrard, and Frank Lampard. He steered the England team to three consecutive quarter-finals in major tournaments and achieved one of their most historic victories—a 5-1 triumph over Germany in Munich in September 2001.

Beyond his tenure with England, Eriksson left an indelible mark on European football.

He secured three Portuguese top-flight titles with Benfica and guided Lazio to their second Serie A triumph in 1999-2000.

His post-England managerial roles included leading Manchester City and Leicester, along with coaching international teams in Mexico, Ivory Coast, and the Philippines.

Eriksson resigned as sporting director at Swedish club Karistad Football 11 months ago due to health issues, marking a challenging chapter in his storied career.

Advising on maintaining a positive mindset, he added, “It’s better not to think about it. You have to trick your brain. I could go around thinking about that all the time and sit at home and be miserable and think I’m unlucky and so on.”

Eriksson’s illustrious managerial career, spanning from 2001 to 2006, saw him coach the so-called “golden generation” of English footballers, including luminaries like David Beckham, Steven Gerrard, and Frank Lampard. He steered the England team to three consecutive quarter-finals in major tournaments and achieved one of their most historic victories—a 5-1 triumph over Germany in Munich in September 2001.

Beyond his tenure with England, Eriksson left an indelible mark on European football.

He secured three Portuguese top-flight titles with Benfica and guided Lazio to their second Serie A triumph in 1999-2000.

His post-England managerial roles included leading Manchester City and Leicester, along with coaching international teams in Mexico, Ivory Coast, and the Philippines.

Eriksson resigned as sporting director at Swedish club Karistad Football 11 months ago due to health issues, marking a challenging chapter in his storied career.

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